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Mobility scooter supports Shirley’s independence

Shirley Roddick on her mobility scooter outside a brick house on a sunny day.

Shirley Roddick has always looked for ways to help others, whether it’s knitting boots and hats for babies in neonatal care, helping out at local schools, or volunteering with the RSA. So, it was more than well-deserved when Shirley received funding through Lottery Individuals with Disabilities for a mobility scooter after deciding to give up driving earlier this year.

Key to Shirley’s funding success was EASIE Living (external website) ’s Lesley Harrison, who travels around the region in the EASIE Living van providing disability equipment and information to people in the community. Lesley regularly comes along to Shirley’s local senior citizens group and offered to help Shirley get funding for a mobility scooter.

“Lesley came along last year, and the scooter was there so me being me I said “I’ll have a go on that.” I did a whirl on it and thought yep that’s what I want,” said Shirley. “When I gave up driving this year, we had a closer look and Leslie said we might be able to get you some help to get a scooter.”

Lesley handled the funding application process for Shirley and before long got the good news that the application was a success.

Shirley has only had the scooter for a couple of months, but it has already increased her independence significantly.

“Before I got the scooter, I’d have to call on Lynn (Shirley’s daughter) to help me get around, but now I can use the scooter which is a great help,” says Shirley. “I can go round to my brothers who is just round the block, I can go down to seniors without having to call on someone or a taxi, and I can go to the library.”

Shirley’s daughter Lynn has also noticed the difference it’s made.

“Her mobility to walk any distance is quite limited now, and when she first got the scooter, she could jump on it and go down and see the others in the complex which she hadn’t been able to do…it’s really given her back some of her independence.”